How to Auto Schedule WordPress Posts

If you post to a WordPress blog on a regular basis like I do on In Photos dot Org you’ll no doubt recognise the fatigue that comes from adjusting the publish date every single time on a new post so it appears a day later. If you have multiple posts like on a daily photoblog you have to remember what day the last post was made and adjust the date accordingly.

A few years ago I wrote a small plugin that I never released to help schedule posts. In the media uploader you could select multiple photos and click a few buttons to be brought to a new page where you could enter title, content and tags for each image. Based on this experience, I suggested it as an idea to one of the teams at Automattic who built Post Bot. I used that for a long time and it has its strengths. If you’re posting content that has the same or similar tags you can copy and paste the tags from one post to another. I posted lots of black and white street images from my home town this way and it was super useful!

I got tired of manually typing out tags, and unfortunately the site broke a few times, with posts not scheduling or one time they scheduled all in one go. Luckily the problems were quickly fixed. However, I started using the WordPress post editor again and scheduling a bunch of photos that way.

Manually editing the publish date quickly became a chore. Lazarus, the form saver Chrome extension, would sometimes popup if I didn’t click exactly on the date, or as I said before I had to remember when the last post was made. They say there’s a plugin for everything, and there is for this too. Check out Publish to Schedule.

You tell “Publish to Schedule” which days and how many posts should be published and when you go into the post editor the next available date is picked for you! The date doesn’t change until you hit Publish but I already used it to schedule a number of posts and it works really well.

Edit: I forgot to mention Daily Image a new plugin by Sam Hotchkiss that does the same sort of job as Postbot but it runs on your own server. The first time you load the plugin it will show you every single unattached image in your media library which can be quite a number of images but it allows you to enter tags and quickly schedule images for posting in a simple manner.

Since my focus here is on image posts I should really mention the WordPress Export Plugin for Lightroom. When installed you can create a new export target that will resize and sharpen your image and upload it to your blog, even if it’s not a WordPress.com site.

Coming up in WP Super Cache 1.5.0

The next version of WP Super Cache will be one with some big changes! There are many small bug fixes and improvements but the one I’m most excited about is moving the legacy cache files into the supercache directory.

The legacy cache files were the files created by the old WP-Cache plugin upon which this plugin is based. They’re really useful as they store the headers sent from the server as well as the page contents. If you’re serving pages that aren’t regular html, such as JSON or XML you don’t want to tell the browser they’re text/html documents. This caching method is also used for anyone who is logged into your site, or left a comment.
There is a problem however. They’re stored in one directory. If you have many thousands of visitors interacting with your site you may end up with a directory containing thousands of files. The names of the cache files are a hash of the URL, gzip support and browser cookies so one file can match one user, or one file can be used by thousands of anonymous users. In the event that someone left a comment on a popular post the plugin has to search through all those files looking for the pages cached for other users who were also looking at that page. On a busy server that can cause problems.

So, in #177 I added code that moves the legacy cache files into the supercache directory. That means the files are stored in directories that reflect the URL of the page that was served which makes it very easy to delete the cached files belonging to that page as they’re all in the same directory!

The new code will look in the old location for legacy files first as some sites will have a large collection of cached files, but any new cache files will be created in the supercache directory.

Ian Dunn submitted code to cache the REST API. It’s not yet complete but we’ll be able to build on the changes to the legacy cache to make caching the API more efficient than it would have been before.

I really need people to help test this. The latest code is running on this site so I’m very confident in how well it works but just because it works on my odd little server doesn’t mean it will work right everywhere. If you want to give it a spin, visit the plugin Github repository and click on the “Clone or download” button. If you don’t know how to clone a Git respository just grab the zip file and install it on your server, overwriting the files in the plugins/wp-super-cache/ directory. If the changes to where cache files go doesn’t interest you, some of the changes in this list might:

WP Super Cache 1.4.9

There’s a new release of WP Super Cache out and it’s a security release to fix XSS problems in the settings pages. Those pages are only accessible by admin users so an anonymous visitor to your site can’t come along and enable it to steal your login cookies but along with those fixes come many bug fixes so it’s worth upgrading if you’re using an old version.

From the Changelog:

  • Fixed bug when not running sem_remove after sem_release. See https://github.com/Automattic/wp-super-cache/issues/85
  • Fixed a PHP error impacting PHP 7.1.
  • Fixed a bug where we cached PUT and DELETE requests. We’re treating them like POST requests now.
  • Delete supercache cache files, even when supercache is disabled, because mod_rewrite rules might still be active.
  • Updated the settings page, moving things around. #173
  • Make file locking less attractive on the settings page and fixed the WPSC_DISABLE_LOCKING constant so it really disables file locking even if the user has enabled it already.
  • Added a WPSC_REMOVE_SEMAPHORE constant that must be defined if sem_remove() is to be used as it may cause problems. #174
  • Added a “wpsc_delete_related_pages_on_edit” filter that on returning 0 will disable deletion of pages outside of page being edited. #175
  • Fixed plugin deleting all cached pages when a site had a static homepage. #175
  • Make sure $cache_path has a trailing slash #177
  • Remove flush() #127 but also check if headers are empty and flush and get headers again. #179
  • Add fix for customizer #161 and don’t cache PUT AND DELETE requests #178
  • Check for superglobals before using them. #131

You can click through to each of the Github pull requests above to see discussion around each bug fix.

If you’re hosting many sites that use WP Super Cache and you’re seeing issues with semaphores it may mean that your users are using file locking. It’s really not needed and in #174 there’s a fix that went into this release. You can disable file locking completely by setting the constant “WPSC_DISABLE_LOCKING” in a global configuration file. The file locking simply slowed down how fast cache files were created and is a hold-over from WP Cache when that plugin used to write directly to the cache files. This plugin writes to temporary files before moving to the final cache files so that locking isn’t really needed, but some sites still use it which is why it’s still around.

I’ve already been working on the next release with efforts to move the legacy cache files into the supercache directories. This will make it easier to maintain them and improve performance. We really need to find a better name for this caching method however. It caches everything – page contents and http headers so it’s quite useful!
If you’re going to test that PR, try #176 too. The plugin only deletes index.html type files right now but this chunk of code cleans up various for loops in the plugin and also deletes any file in the named directory. There are some restrictions on it so it won’t delete anything outside the cache directory.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release!

Automattic in 2016

Automattic

This is (most of) Automattic. We’re in the town of Whistler, Canada for the annual Grand Meetup. The company is growing every year, from tiny origins when a small group of us hacked away on a couple of servers to almost 500 now!

In the old days the company portrait was easy. The first one was us seated around a large table. I remember well the one in Breckinridge, Colorado. The whole company fit on the stairs leading up to one of the houses we had rented.

In recent years it’s been a challenge. This year Rose Goldman Simon and I scouted the town of Whistler for suitable locations. Rose had already been around and picked out several so I helped to narrow it down. We’d need:

  • Somewhere high up for the photographer to stand so as many people as possible could be seen.
  • Tuesday, the day this was made, was a lovely bright day, but that would play havoc with the photo. We needed a large shaded area.
  • It needed to be close to where we’re staying. The further away we had to walk the more complicated it would become.

We narrowed it down to two locations. One in front of a local store where there’s a nice courtyard and this location above. This won out despite the fact that sunlight would be shining on the camera lens but a large whiteboard helped keep the sun off. Ironically as people dispersed after the shoot, the shadows crept up past where the camera was which would have simplified things!

Final development of the photo was in Lightroom and Affinity Photo.

You’ll also find the photo on Matt’s blog, and shared by many of my colleagues elsewhere. I’ve also uploaded the full resolution image on Cloudup.com for your viewing pleasure.

Split screen on your phone

thread on Reddit asked what you use the new split screen functionality in Android Nougat for. Apparently people use it to browse Reddit and watch YouTube at the same time. 

Samsung Android phones have had this functionality for a while but I rarely use it however I decided to try this, and it works fairly well!

‘course I don’t know how you can concentrate on something else and watch a video at the same time..

Hey! It even works with the WordPress app! 

I guess it would be useful for picking out quotes from articles, and it would save lots of tapping on the multitasking button to change apps when copying text.

Have you used the split screen feature of your phone if it has it?

WordPress is thirteen!

You could have knocked me over with a feather today when I read Matt’s post announcing that WordPress was celebrating a birthday!

It didn’t seem so long ago that we were working on b2++, hacking the multiuser bits in and doing all sorts of crazy things with it.

Now I’m “typing” this on a mobile phone by swiping my finger across a virtual keyboard. Back then the closest to this that I could imagine would be some sort of SMS integration!

WordPress today is unrecognisable from what it was back then, especially if you use the slick Calypso interface.

I’m looking forward to seeing what the next few years bring.

The Web Won’t Forget Alex King

If you use a WordPress site, either as a visitor or owner, you’re using code that Alex King, one of the original developers of WordPress, worked on.

He passed away after fighting cancer for 2 years but his online presence lives on in the form of his blog with it’s deep archive of posts going back years, and in so much code that it’s humbling to look at his projects page. Looking through the svn log of WordPress trunk shows he still had a hand in helping the WordPress project until relatively recently:

trunk$ svn log|grep alexkingorg
props alexkingorg for the initial, long-suffering patch.
props alexkingorg. fixes #24162.
Props alexkingorg
`wp.media` instead of just `media`. props alexkingorg, see #22676.
Add $post_ID context to the pre_ping filter. props alexkingorg, devesine. fixes #18506.
Add filter so the users can select custom image sizes added by themes and plugins, props alexkingorg, fixes #18520
esc_textarea() and application for obvious textarea escaping. props alexkingorg. fixes #15454
Escape links by default. Props alexkingorg. see #13051
Safely include class-json.php, class-simplepie.php and class-snoopy.php, props alexkingorg, fixes #11827
Fix user creation from admin after changes for #10751. Fixes #10811 props alexkingorg.
Hooks needed to allow alternate category admin inteface. Props alexkingorg. fixes #3408
Wrap cat name in CDATA. props alexkingorg. fixes #3252

I’m sorry I never met Alex, however I remember working virtually with him and Adam Tow on AllThingsD which seems like a lifetime away now. Adam has a great article on Alex on his blog, as does Matt who went into detail about Alex’s involvement with WordPress going back to the days of b2. I had completely forgotten the CSS competition he mentioned!

Alex, your legacy lives on.